Magazine Archives

November 2005
November 2005
Larry Frolick foretells the death of suburbia at the hands of urban planning; Chris Tenove looks at the legacy of the Nuremburg trials in the modern-day prosecution of war crimes; Adam Gilders goes to meet a feral child known as the “Fiji Chicken Man”; Joshua Knelman investigates the multi-billion-dollar business of art theft; fiction by Merilyn Simonds; and more

October 2005
October 2005
Chris Wood examines the environmental and financial impact of Canada’s glaciers; Gwynne Dyer warns of the consequences of US attempts to constrain China militarily; Alison Gillmor asks if the household organization trend hasn’t gone overboard; Francis Chalifour reflects on coming to terms with the death of his father; Eamon Mac Mahon photographs Uranium City, a Saskatchewan mining town that boomed during the Cold War; and more

September 2005
September 2005
Wendy Dennis argues that new findings and the popularity of The Sopranos signal a return from obscurity for psychoanalysis; James Laxer considers the proper role of the American empire in global politics; Alastair Brown recounts his love affair with film; Timothy Taylor looks at the globalization of English soccer; poetry by Lisa Jarnot; and more

July/August 2005
July/August 2005: Summer Reading
Murray Dobbin asks if Jim Harris can bring the Green Party to the mainstream; love letters by Margaret Atwood, David Bezmozgis, Leonard Cohen, Sheila Heti, Jonathan Lethem, MG Vassanji, and Juli Zeh; fiction by Wayne Johnson, Helen Humphreys, Robin Collyer, Yiorgos Skabardonis, and Richard Hahn; Jake MacDonald looks at the US military’s growing use of psychological tactics, both on enemies and at home; and more

May 2005
May 2005
Bill Cameron describes his life with terminal cancer; David Berlin speaks to Israeli settlers ordered to withdraw from their settlement on the Gaza Strip; Rick Salutin ponders the “good guys” and “bad guys” of his son’s moral world; Patrick Lane wrestles with his complicity in the logging industry that is consuming the forests he grew up in; Robert Mason Lee charts the descent of the British monarchy from their formerly sacrosanct status; and more

April 2005
April 2005
Don Gillmor considers the implications of Alberta’s considerable oil reserves in a climate of increasing scarcity; Joan Bryden argues that the Catholic Church’s secretive marriage-annulment process makes its stance on the sanctity of male-female marriage hypocritical; Rita Leistner visits and photographs Baghdad’s largest psychiatric hospital; Larry Frolick tells the story of a disastrous tidal wave reaching a small Thai village; fiction by Lynn Coady; and more

March 2005
March 2005
Jeremy Rifkin suggests that Canada is quietly becoming one with the US’s “blue states”; George Emerson modestly proposes that Canada tax blank paper, to go along with its blank CD tariff; Susan McLelland looks at efforts to secure rights and protections for Canada’s huge population of immigrant nannies; Andrew Mitrovica profiles Canada’s most successful undercover agent; short fiction by Margaret Atwood; and more

February 2005
February 2005
Allan Gregg argues that Paul Martin’s health accord threatens Canada’s national unity; John Fraser looks at the evolution of modern China and wonders what its future relationship with Canada will be; Lawrence Hill asks what black Americans’ obligations are to the people of Africa; Brian Preston asks if a new marijuana mist could become the Aspirin of the twenty-first century; and more

December/January 2005
December/January 2005
Wendy Dennis ponders the contrast between the realities of modern marriage and the myths that still surround it; Andrea Mandel-Campbell warns that Canada may be losing its claim to the North; Ahmet Sel photographs the people of Kabul; Paul Webster sounds an alarm about fire retardants that may in fact be toxic; Donna Morrissey remembers a snowy drive with her father; and more

Canada & its place in the world. Published by
the non-profit charitable Walrus Foundation
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